Tags: class

2011 July

Week 29: Basic Baby Care Class

10/13/2013 My checkup this week went pretty smoothly. I got a flu shot to protect me and the baby from the flu this season. Since they were doing it in-house, I opted to do it as well. There was a point where I thought there might be an issue. The nurse had measured my belly and when the doctor saw the measurements, she wanted to measure it again. When the nurse had measured, the belly was at 32 cm, which is too large for my 29th week. So the doctor measured me and she said I was only at 30 cm. sometimes when the baby is stretching or turned a certain way, the belly could seem bigger than average. If I had measured largest than average, I would have had to go to the doctor once a week to monitor the progress and make sure the baby wasn’t growing too big too fast.

We also went to a basic infant care class at the Winnie Palmer hospital. It was scheduled for two hours, but in actuality it was two and a half hours. I thought it was really a waste of time. The class taught some really basic things, like how to hold your baby, how to swaddle, when to bathe your baby, how to take care of the umbilical cord and how to take care of a circumcision (the last was a total waste of time since I’m having a girl and even if I were having a boy, I wouldn’t circumcise the poor thing.) There was also a brief lecture with corresponding photos of various types of baby poop.

I felt like 90% of the lecture was either common sense or something the pediatrician/nurse would tell you before you took the baby home. And if you’ve ever been around babies before, you really don’t need to go to this class.

The only thing I thought was of any interest was the short video featuring Dr. Harvey Karp. He has a five step process to calming your baby. The video showed all five steps, swaddling, side/stomach position, shushing, swinging and suckling. It was a fascinating thing to see, especially the shushing because the baby looked like it was getting rebooted. The baby’s face became all blank and the eyes got all big. I swear, he’s rebooting the baby brain there. But it got the baby to quite down, so it definitely did work.

Overall though, I thought it was a huge waste of time and not worth the $40 for that class. I’d say skip it if you have any sort of common sense or have been around babies before. I think you’re better off talking to people who have had children and save yourself the boredom of a lecture.

Originally published at Samantha Ling. You can comment here or there.

2011 July

Birthing Class: Breathing Exercises

One of the things we did in class was a couple of breathing exercises. They had us grab a birth ball, which was basically a yoga ball/exercise ball. After going through all the balls, I picked the smallest one and it was clear that it was too big for me. They had to blow up a special small one for me because I am a tiny tiny woman. (That’s sarcasm, btw, I’m 5’4″.)

They also brought out a small bucket of iced water, which made me wonder what that was for, and I wasn’t happy to hear what we were going to do with it.

All I can say is that it was a torture technique. We were to stick our hand into the bucket while we were to do our breathing exercises. It was supposed to simulate the pain of labor. I wasn’t happy because I really preferred to be blissfully unaware of how exactly painful it was going to be. If anything, it made me more anxious about giving birth, not more relaxed.

But we went through the exercise anyway because we were good students. The room was nice and quiet and all the women were doing the breathing, whether it was the hee hee hoo method or breath in for 4 seconds, breath out for 4 seconds, we were doing it with our hand in that frigid water.

All that torture had a point though, Our husbands had been standing behind us trying to help us to breath, to concentrate on anything besides the cold water. After our turn was over, we switched places and the husbands had to put their hands into the water.

Since I had a teeny tiny ball, which I thought looked like Mars, but hubs was like it’s too small to be Mars, it’s more like a moon, we switched it out to one of the bigger balls so he could sit properly. Then it was the men’s turn.

When Hubs sat down and we got ready to do the exercise, he whispered, ” This is all your fault!” To which I laughed heartily and I realized that the room had busted out into chaos around me, though it had nothing to do with us. The men seemed to have become a rowdy bunch though the music that they’d put on for them was perhaps not the most appropriate. It was shut up smooth it from Salt n’ Peppa, and I think it might have loosened some sort of nervous tension.

After order was restored, the men did their turn and I think it gave them a decent idea of what the women would be going through during labor, hopefully, it would make them more sympathetic, but I don’t think so. I think a lot of the men in that room were big man boys who didn’t want to be there and didn’t see the point. A few people I know didn’t think it was worth going and refused to go to any birthing classes. I will tell you now that I would have never married a man like that. Not the second time around anyway.

Luckily, I have a great husband who will be a hands-on dad.

Then we went through the exercise again with the women, which I thought was not helpful again as I thought it was just a sadistic torture.

The point of the breathing exercises was really to get the women into a meditative state so that we wouldn’t be focused on the pain so much and therefore prolong the need for an epidural. I think this is a good idea especially if you don’t like the idea of being pumped full of drugs.

I plan to go as long as possible because the moment you take the epidural, you’re bed bound and you never know when that baby will arrive, which means you could be pumping narcotics into your body for several hours. I don’t take aspirin for a headache or any pains unless it’s debilitating, so I don’t like the idea of having a lot of drugs in my system.

It’s best to walk about and move around before the actual pushing happens. Laying in bed is probably the worst thing that you could do. It apparently increases the chance of needing a cesarean.

That’s what I’m hoping to do anyway. There’s no award for going so long without pain medication, and there’s no shame in taking it. I plan on getting the epidural, it’s just a matter of when.

Originally published at Samantha Ling. You can comment here or there.

2011 July

Birthing Class: Breathing Exercises

One of the things we did in class was a couple of breathing exercises. They had us grab a birth ball, which was basically a yoga ball/exercise ball. After going through all the balls, I picked the smallest one and it was clear that it was too big for me. They had to blow up a special small one for me because I am a tiny tiny woman. (That’s sarcasm, btw, I’m 5’4″.)

They also brought out a small bucket of iced water, which made me wonder what that was for, and I wasn’t happy to hear what we were going to do with it.

All I can say is that it was a torture technique. We were to stick our hand into the bucket while we were to do our breathing exercises. It was supposed to simulate the pain of labor. I wasn’t happy because I really preferred to be blissfully unaware of how exactly painful it was going to be. If anything, it made me more anxious about giving birth, not more relaxed. 

But we went through the exercise anyway because we were good students. The room was nice and quiet and all the women were doing the breathing, whether it was the hee hee hoo method or breath in for 4 seconds, breath out for 4 seconds, we were doing it with our hand in that frigid water.

All that torture had a point though, Our husbands had been standing behind us trying to help us to breath, to concentrate on anything besides the cold water. After our turn was over, we switched places and the husbands had to put their hands into the water.

Since I had a teeny tiny ball, which I thought looked like Mars, but hubs was like it’s too small to be Mars, it’s more like a moon, we switched it out to one of the bigger balls so he could sit properly. Then it was the men’s turn.

When Hubs sat down and we got ready to do the exercise, he whispered, ” This is all your fault!” To which I laughed heartily and I realized that the room had busted out into chaos around me, though it had nothing to do with us. The men seemed to have become a rowdy bunch though the music that they’d put on for them was perhaps not the most appropriate. It was shut up smooth it from Salt n’ Peppa, and I think it might have loosened some sort of nervous tension. 

After order was restored, the men did their turn and I think it gave them a decent idea of what the women would be going through during labor, hopefully, it would make them more sympathetic, but I don’t think so. I think a lot of the men in that room were big man boys who didn’t want to be there and didn’t see the point. A few people I know didn’t think it was worth going and refused to go to any birthing classes. I will tell you now that I would have never married a man like that. Not the second time around anyway.

Luckily, I have a great husband who will be a hands-on dad.

Then we went through the exercise again with the women, which I thought was not helpful again as I thought it was just a sadistic torture. 

The point of the breathing exercises was really to get the women into a meditative state so that we wouldn’t be focused on the pain so much and therefore prolong the need for an epidural. I think this is a good idea especially if you don’t like the idea of being pumped full of drugs. 

I plan to go as long as possible because the moment you take the epidural, you’re bed bound and you never know when that baby will arrive, which means you could be pumping narcotics into your body for several hours. I don’t take aspirin for a headache or any pains unless it’s debilitating, so I don’t like the idea of having a lot of drugs in my system.

It’s best to walk about and move around before the actual pushing happens. Laying in bed is probably the worst thing that you could do. It apparently increases the chance of needing a cesarean. 

That’s what I’m hoping to do anyway. There’s no award for going so long without pain medication, and there’s no shame in taking it. I plan on getting the epidural, it’s just a matter of when. 

Originally published at Samantha Ling. You can comment here or there.

2011 July

Week 28: Birthing Class: An Introduction

Week 28

The baby moves around pretty much like clockwork. They apparently have thirty minute sleep cycles, so every hour, they will be awake and moving about. Quite honestly, don’t feel her moving every hour, though periodically throughout the day, I will feel her moving, she is, again, most active in the evening and I can feel her rolling over, readjusting her position and kicking! At some point, she will be rolling around a lot less mostly because there won’t be any room left in the belly and all I will feel are jabs and kicks. She’s strong enough now to knocks things off my belly if I rest things on it….like the ipad. Guess she doesn’t like me using the belly like a table.

Yesterday, Hubs and I went to our first birthing class. The doctor had mentioned that we needed to go before the baby is born and since she was bringing it up now, I figured that I’d sign up for them. It turns out that they nag because most everyone waits a few more weeks before they get their act together. Almost everyone in class was due in November, except this one couple who was basically due in two weeks.

It turned out that everyone in our class was having a girl. The conspiracy theorist in me thinks there is something in the water killing all the male sperm cells leaving us with a planet full of girls. But on the other hand, the O’Malligans are having a boy and so are The Burdies, so it’s just a coincidence. I’ve probably been reading too many conspiracy novels.

The class I went to was called NewMom2b and I recommend it, especially if you have fears about birthing. They talk about what happens to your body when you go into labor, what your baby is doing, epidurals, when you should go into the hospital and a couple of breathing exercises. The class is from 9am to 3pm and lunch is included. It was Toojay’s sandwiches and wraps, so be aware of that if you’re avoiding mayonnaise or deli meats. They did have a veggie wrap, but it didn’t look good. I’d give them a call if you have special dietary needs, they seem willing to work with you. I ate the chicken wrap, which had some mayo in it, but I know that Toojay’s mayo comes out of a jar and it’s not housemade with raw eggs like some of the fancier restaurants. I realized after seeing the lunch spread that I actually eat fairly healthy at home (except for the fatty sugary desserts). Hubs makes some pretty good low-fat meals and that’s probably helped me with not gaining a massive amount of pregnancy weight.

One of the things that the nurses asked us was what we were afraid of. I said that I was afraid of having a ginormous baby since people seem to think that we’re going to have an eight pound baby. The average is only about six pounds. The nurses said that it’s not going to be a problem, you can birth an eight pound baby. But if you have a preference of birthing a healthy six pound baby as opposed to an eight pound baby, which would you prefer to do?

Some people mentioned that they were afraid of the boys that their daughters would have to deal with and I thought that if there were more boys that were taught well, we wouldn’t have to worry about this stuff. But then if there were less assholes of both genders, we wouldn’t have to worry about our children so much. Having watched too many shows on the Investigative Discovery channel, I can say there are crazy, sadistic, sociopathic people of both genders. But my hope is that I teach my daughter to be strong and smart enough not to get involved with terrible boys or be in situations where they may get into trouble,  and find someone who will cherish and love them. 

It seems like people are more full of hate in general than they used to be whether it be racism, ageism, genderism, homophobia  or classism. It seems to me there are people who want to either segregate or outright kill those who don’t agree with them and that’s a scary place to be. Maybe the internet has allowed for them to congregate anonymously and realize there are more of them than they thought. They no longer have to hide in their mother’s basement, hiding their hate. I’m hoping that more of us are more accepting and we’re only hearing about the squeaky wheels. I’m hoping that we’re all trying to make the world a better place than we left it. But I’m getting a little bit side tracked here. 

A couple of the new moms were teachers and we discussed that in most of these classes, we only retained about 10% of the information from class. I though that was funny since I had a weeklong training session for work and I was required to remember all of it. But then again, I did take copious notes that I could refer to later, which I didn’t do in the birthing class. So it’s not surprising that I don’t remember what the majority of the class was about, but I do remember important stuff. 

 

But I think this post has gotten a little bit long, so I’ll split it up a little bit. Next post, breathing excercises!

Originally published at Samantha Ling. You can comment here or there.